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There are 3 classes of common fires and 2 specialty classes.

Fires are classified into 5 groups:



CLASS A: Class A fires involve common combustibles such as wood, paper, cloth, rubber, trash and plastics. They are common in typical commercial and home settings, but can occur anywhere these types of materials are found.

CLASS B: Class B fires involve flammable liquids' gases, solvents, oil, gasoline, paint, lacquers, tars and other synthetic or oil-based products. Class B fires often spread rapidly and, unless properly secured, can reflash after the flames are extinguished.

CLASS C: Class C fires involve energized electrical equipment, such as wiring, controls, motors, data processing panels or appliances. They can be caused by a spark, power surge or short circuit and typically occur in locations that are difficult to reach and see.

CLASS D: Class D fires involve combustible metals such as magnesium and sodium. Combustible metal fires are unique industrial hazards which require special dry powder agents.

CLASS K: Class K fires involve combustible cooking media such as oils and grease commonly found in commercial kitchens. The new cooking media formulations used form commercial food preparation require a special wet chemical extinguishing agent that is specially suited for extinguishing and suppressing these extremely hot fires that have the ability to reflash.

(NOTE: Although ABC and BC Dry Chemical extinguishers can control a fire involving electronic equipment, the National Fire Code (NFPA 75-1999 edition), Section 6-3-2, specifically advises against dry-chemical extinguishers for fires involving computers or other delicate electronic equipment due to the potential damage from residues.

Standard for the Protection of Electronic Computer/Data Processing Equipment

6-3.2 Listed extinguishers with a minimum rating of 2-A shall be provided for use on fires in ordinary combustible materials, such as paper and plastics. Dry chemical extinguishers shall not be permitted.")